Skip to main content

About your Search

English 40
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
city facing rising sea levels and the next big storm. >> if sandy were to come close or directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for
, and look for a starting point. end of april, the city had the momentous thing, the riots that followed the rodney king case verdict. about a story out of that, one of many unsolved murders harry bosch worked on back then. because of the events that occurred, he was unable to solve the case. 20 years later, he goes back and hopefully bring justice to the case. tavis: you were writing for the l.a. times had at the time of the riots, so you wrote about the riots for "the l.a. times." looking back, coming to your real life, what do you make, looking back at that moment? >> it was probably the most surreal moment, he but maybe the most important moment for me as a reporter. i was a reporter a couple more years after that, and then i was back to writing books. to see what happened to the city, to be surprised by what happened -- it was a good lesson learned. not understanding the pressures that were underneath the surface of this town. it makes you think about it. it is a question in the book. 20 years later, how far have we come? could it happen again if the right circumstances are there? i
a high-profile misconduct lawsuit involving a group of cops known as the riders. now city leaders are hoping a last-minute tentative deal will avoid a federal takeover of the department. matthai kuruvila, i know you've been covering this story. what are the details of this settlement and what does it mean for the department? >> well, what this agreement involves is an agreement between the police union, the city and professors attorneys who filed this original civil rights lawsuit. what they've decided on is creating a compliance director. now, this would be a quasi mayor of oakland in a sense in that he gets to -- he or she would have the power to fire the police chief with the court approval. they would have the power to direct the city administrators. those are two things currently only the mayor has. it's limited in scope in that it would only effect the reform tasks that are incomplete for the police department. the city had been very concerned that this potential receiver, or federal receiver, would have oversight over the entire police department. so all -- so all three sid
a living. this is what has become of the ancient city. he has lost his home and his job, so every day he sifts through filth and stench so he can feed his children. life is really bad. there is no work and money. that is why i come here to collect and rubbish. this revolution was supposedly about a better future and a better tomorrow, and many residents still cling to that hope, and they believe the ongoing fighting, not just in the city but also in the countryside, is worth the struggle. a petrol now comes from a barrel at the side of the road. three times the price it was before the revolution. people queued for hours in the cold for bread, now 10 times more expensive and in short supply. the bombardment has subsided, but the suffering has not, and the fighting has moved elsewhere. we joined the rebels on an operation, running across open ground to avoid sniper fire. now the fighters are laying siege to an infantry training school. the free syrian army controls most of the land here, and so the 300 government troops inside know they are surrounded. no reinforcements to come. the rebels
-quarter earnings. is this gloomy news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if that includes cutting staff. and the need to slim down is not unique to citi; it's industry- wide. a financial industry runs into huge problems. it happened in the '30s, and it happened in the last five years. when you go through these periods, you go through a lot of change. that industry is now trying to figure out what is the right size of the industry. >> reporter: still, economists say citi's action today is not the start of a new wave of mass layoffs across corporate america. the nation's job market may not be robust, but it's not frozen, either. in fact, today, the payroll firm a.d.p. reported 118,000
owning a newspaper and radio and tv stations in the same big city. thus he would give the massive media companies free rein to devour more of the competition. the chairman is julius genachowski, appointed to the job by president barack obama. now, the fcc tried to pull this same stunt under a republican chairman back in the second term of george w. bush, but at hearings held around the country an angry public fought back. >> we told you a year ago when you came to seattle that media consolidation is a patently bad idea. no "ifs," "ands," or "buts" about it. so with all due respect i ask you, what part of that didn't you understand? >> i'm a republican and i'm a capitalist, but some areas of our private sector must be regulated. freedom of information is too important, we must be proactive in protecting that fundamental freedom. >> if the fcc is here wanting to know if chicago's residents are being well served, the answer is no. if local talent is being covered, the answer is no. if community issues are being treated sensitively, the answer is no. if minority groups are getting the cover
jobs are in consumer banking. the move comes less than two months since a shakeup at citi ousting former c.e.o., vikram pandit. he was succeeded by michael corbat. the bank nearly collapsed during the crisis and ultimately received bailouts totaling $45 billion, money that citi has since repaid. roben farzhad has long watched the changes at citi for bloomberg "businessweek" and joins us again tonight. roben, welcome. today we heard that stocks soared on the news of these layoffs. what does that tell us about what was going on at citi? >> it's sad, actually. citigroup is know-- you could say the financial crisis is over but in the throes of an existential crisis. it doesn't know what it wants to be. investors have been clamoring for a while for citigroup to simplify, to shed payrolls, to be good at something. it does everything, but it isn't market leading, necessarily, in any one category. and by and large, they got the layoffs, at least the beginning round of layoffs that they wanted today. >> ifill: we know many of these layoffs are noin the u.s., but i assume part of the relati
. only a few roads are available. and going out of the city into the suburban areas that are held by the free syrian army. what you can see is a deterioration in the position of the regime and the strain of war as well. will that result in and trying to somehow do a deal? i do not know. but i know that a political deal is the only real choice the syrians have. if they do not get that, they face a long and bloody war. >> today, we have the american and russian foreign ministers meeting with the u.n. envoy to syria at a conference in ireland. russia has been a key player. do you understand whether the russians are getting closer to a western position when it comes to assad's future? >> if they are common their remarks from the meeting did not seem to suggest that they were prepared to go the extra mile or make some kind of deal. the issue is the fact that the u.n. security council is paralyzed. paralyzed over this whole issue of syria. the western countries have one position. russia and china have another. both sides actually need to move. holding on to positions that do not work. a
"middleton," similar to "city island." arturo wrote the music for it. we are good buddies. tavis: let me go back to the story of the movie, "a dark truth." you play a talk show host that is a former cia agent. did you ever imagine yourself, given your views on the world, being -- >> cia? tavis: being a political talk show host. >> no, no. tavis: you do have views, though. >> we all have views. i choose to live my life as a bomb maker, as an artist. that is what i am interested -- as a filmmaker, as an artist. that is what i am interested in. we all have political views. we are interested in how the world affairs, and how we treat each other as human beings. but the political scene has no interest to me. people try to suck you in. unfortunately, i have an situations where there have been statements out there, in this modern day of the internet, when people were making statements as though you were making them. i had to shut down 6 facebook pages making statements i have never made. how you control that? there is no respect about each other's privacy. it is a free-for-all. i am sure you have
is that the city center. armed rebels are in parts of the ring around damascus. this is one of them. the rebels to film to this, and any civilians who have not escaped, have been shelled in the last few days. they keep the rebels back from this strong. . bbc was invited in to visit the detention center run by air force intelligence. we were not allowed to see the cellblocks. human rights groups say torture happens here. they paraded six prisoners. they said they were not speaking underdressed. the governor said any doubters were making the wrong assumptions about syria's secular state. syrian state tv was in the room to film. none of the men had been in court. all have confessed to being in al qaeda-style groups. >> the main work is making explosive devices to plant. >> they produce the algerian passport of this person, who said he was also a french citizen. >> i decided to do something for the children of syria, for the families and the powerless. i decided to join the jihad rather than crying in front of my tv. >> he would not answer when i asked if he had been tortured. two said there were p
. the middle east editor is in damascus and sent this report on the battle for an increasingly divided city. >> damascus is at the heart of the bloodiest arab uprising. they keep them under tight security that squeezes traffic down the main road. the capitals still functions. but the battle for damascus is under way. it is happening in the suburbs after months of shelling and air strikes. it is controlled by the rebels the claim they own about one- third of greater damascus. the rebels only have pockets of ground. these were blocks of flats. all sides should distinguish between civilians hiding. almost every building is damaged, which suggests is being treated as a military target. >> they sought a bomb and a barrel of explosives dropped from the helicopter. the blitz is breaking the city and breaking lives. it isn't breaking with the president's enemies. >> they have shown that they have the stomach for a fight. they can endure pain and they have the conviction that if they don't, they will be killed. the question for them is what more they will have to do. the fighters showed off what the
,013. indianapolis will be the first major american city to replace all city-owned cars with electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. the program announced today calls for completing the switch by 2025. the city also plans to phase in fire trucks and other heavy vehicles that run on compressed natural gas. officials said they're asking auto makers to create plug-in hybrid police cars, which don't yet exist. retiring u.s. senator joe lieberman said goodbye to the senate today, with an appeal for principled compromise. he warned that gridlock is preventing progress on a host of problems. lieberman ran as the democratic vice presidential nominee in 2000. all told, he spent 24 years in the senate, first as a democrat, and since 2006, as an independent. a pantheon of music legends takes the stage tonight in new york, raising money for those hit hardest by hurricane sandy. the program for the "12-12-12" concert includes paul mccartney, bruce springsteen, the rolling stones, kanye west and alicia keys, among many others. the concert and telethon could reach two billion people on radio and t.v., in movi
by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: british period dramas have long held a special fascination for american television audiences, upstairs, downstairs, pride and prejudice have been released to widespread attention and praise, downton abbey anybody the most successful and the latest, oscar-winning prize winner julian fellows already won six emmys and legions on fans on both sides of the pond. it is back on pbs in january and here is a teaser for the third season. >> from war and peace downton abbey still stands. >> no one must know. >> i am warning you. >> rose: joining me now, four of the stars, hugh bonneville, plays lord granderson familiar. >> elizabeth mcgovern. >> lady grantham. >> jim carter plays the butler and joanne greg plays anna, the head house made, i am proud to have all of you here. >> let me start and go around and tell me where you left your character and what to expect this year. >> the end of season 2. >> robert was relieved that the war and the spanish flu had deserted at long last and maybe he would get his home
of the most visited holiday landmarks in the city. and tom, the big board's tree is embroiled in a twitter battle for bragging rights as the city's best with another famous tree, the one at rockefeller center.. >> on my way to work this morning, i saw the tree by the new york stock exchange, and it looks pretty impressive. >> tom: we saw you putting ornaments on it. but the trees are tweeting? is that right? >> susie: not quite right, and those trees are a little too high for me to reach to put an ornament. that's "nightly business report" for tuesday, december 4. have a great evening, everyone, and you, too, tom. >> tom: good night, susie. we'll see you online at, and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh >>> it all started with a single lemon squeezer, and now 30 years later, bonnie grossman's house is filled with collections of all kinds. kitchen utensils, medicines, walking sticks, bottle whimsies, quilts, tramp art, little houses, and the work of self-taught artists, like alex maldonado. for bonnie, each
.c.'s mayor and city council. next major tax break, state and local taxes. deductible in full from taxable income. this costs the federal government about $47 billion a year, almost 5% of the annual deficit. so what's the objection to getting rid of the state and local tax deduction? >> the deductions for state and local taxes lowers the cost the citizens are paying those state and local taxes. it means those governments can charge higher tax than they otherwise would. take that away they'll have to lower their revenues at a time when they're in trouble themselves or it's going raise the cost to the citizens who won't be happy about it. >> reporter: as lawmakers rush to rescue the economy from the fiscal cliff emergency, they have focused -- as have we thus far -- on itemized deductions. but when it comes to tax breaks or preferences, says robert... >> not just deductions. it includes things like exclusion from income, the biggest one of which is the we don't tax you on the premiums your employer pays for the health insurance we get. much bigger than anything on the deduction side. it's no
military base near the northern city of aleppo. new details have emerged from south africa on the health of former president nelson mandela. the government announced today that military doctors are treating him for a recurring lung infection. mandela is 94 years old. he's been hospitalized since saturday, but officials said he is responding to treatment. an investigation of paying pro football players for causing injuries took a sharp new turn today. the man appointed to hear appeals, former nfl commissioner paul tagliabue, voided the suspensions of four current and former new orleans saints. tagliabue said actions by team coaches and others had contaminated the case. he did agree that three of the players should be fined. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to ray. >> suarez: cairo is the scene of mass rallies again tonight. demonstrators on both sides of the upcoming referendum are on the streets of the capital. their refrain was "bread, freedom and sharia" or islamic law from supporters of president mohammed morsi in cairo. morsi, morsi, they chanted. reporters also g
by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> good evening. tonight i can roar to the american people and to the world that the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden, the leader of al-qaeda. and a terrorist who is responsible for the murder of thousands of innocent men, women and children. for over two decades, bin laden has been al-qaeda's leader and symbol, and continued plot attacks against our countries, friends and allies. the death of bin laden signifies the most significant achievement to date in our effort counterterrorisms professionals to work tire loalsly to achieve this outcome. the american people do not see their work nor know their names but tonight they feel the satisfaction of their work and the result of their pursuit of justice. >> rose: that was president obama in may announcing the killing of america's most wanted terrorist. a new film about to be released by the oscar winning director kathryn bigelow and screen writer mark boal examines the ten-year hunt for bin laden. it is called zero dark thirty,
, marginal towns. and then it came to the cities. we went back to this into account -- to a town, poor and neglected. we found a festering frustrations of young and old. they say nothing has changed. they did say, we got freedom of expression. we heard the same thing in the capital. but they expected more. even though anger boils over on the streets, most say they were willing to wait as long as they saw evidence the country was moving in the right direction. >> what are the chances that the new government can fulfill that demand for jobs amongst its young people? >> it is going to take a long time. look at the problems in europe and america. it is all about jobs. that is when it comes down to. these are countries who have lived with decades of authoritarian rule. in tunisia, 75% of its exports go through europe. there is also a physical problem. you need a leadership concentrating on the right issues. there is a criticism here. in tunis, the leaders are too bogged down in political battles. the role of religion in the street -- state. two years of feels like a long time if you are wai
, a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: robert gates is here, hhe has had a distinguished career in public service spanning six decades and served under eight presidents from lyndon johnson to barack obama. >> he took the top job in 1991 under george h.w. bush, president of texas a & m university from 2002 to 2006 when president george w. bush appointed him secretary of defense. president obama asked him to stay at the pentagon making him the first defense secretary to serve in both a republican and the democratic administration, he left his post in june, 2011. at his farewell ceremony president obama awarded him the presidential award of freedom. >> the highest honor. >> this is a man i have come to know and respect. a humble american patriot. a man of common sense and decency. quite simply one of our nation's finest public servants. >> rose: today the united states face as wave of foreign policy challenges, including the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical w
to stay clear. fighting near the airport and around the capital city has intensified in the past week. the latest amateur video showed street battles and a car set afire by a rocket attack. the exiled leader of hamas khaled meshaal entered gaza today for the first time. it was, in part, a show of defiance after the militant group's latest clash with israel. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: he crossed the border from egypt with tears in his eyes. the leader of hamas setting foot on palestinian territory for the first time in 37 years. he had never been to gaza in his life but after kissing the tarmac apparently sobbing as he did so khaled meshaal said gaza had always been in his heart. there to greet him were the al qassam brigades. named after an arab rebel leader killed by the british in the 1930s. 80 years on the fight for self- rule isn't over. and thousands turned out to watch meshaal's cavalcade crawl through gaza city just days after a war with israel which left around 160 palestinians dead. >> the second was when i was
that cities have announced 11,000 job cuts, is this the beginning of a trend, mark. >> no, susie, i don't think so. if washington can reasonably address the fiscal issues and i'm still confident that they will ultimately get it together. there will be a fair amount of -- but at the end of the day they'll get it together. if they're able to do that when we get into next spring, i do think we're going into much better shape. businesses will get it back and certainly investor will be happy about that. by this time next year i think we should see a much better job market because the housing whichs already starting to turn should be in full swing. so no, i don't think businesses are going to pull back. the only reason they would is if washington completely because this. at this point i don't think that's going to happen. >> susie: how do you think the federal reserve is going to read in today's jobs report. they're meeting on tuesday as you know. do you think it's going to trigger any new response from the fed? >> well, as you know the fed's on high alert. they've got their foot to the acce
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: maestro gustavo dudamel is here, berlin philharmonic once called him the most astonishingly talented conductor industry ever come across. he is beloved bolivar orchestra in vendz well, ven venezuela anw is with the la philharmonic. ♪ >> rose: he is in new york to, bolivar orchestra in carnegie called, voices from latin america, also dedicated further musical education and social justice around the world, i am pleased to have gustavo dudamel at this table for the first time. >> thank you. it is an honor. >> rose: my pleasure. >> huge honor. >> rose: we have been wanting to do this for a while. tell me about the music you have selected for the performance. >> yes. this is a festival called dos americas here in new york, and we decide to bring, you know, this amazing music that we have, this very latin, in a ways of irs stick but deep music by es at the vek, villalobos, by ar bon, carlos chavez, so for us it is very important to show the soul of our music also, also to play the strauss ballad,
the whole city. >> "al qaeda in yemen." >> frontline continues online. explore the reporting on "cell tower deaths" from our partners at propublica, more about who's responsible for a worker's safety from osha's jordan barab, and read at&t's statement to frontline. get insights into working at mf global from a former broker. >> sipping the kool-aid at that time. >> learn more about the volckr rule, and follow frontline on facebook and twitter, or tell us what you think at >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan, committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by tfrontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprpr
when we begin. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. begin this evening with politic. less than a month remains for lawmaker to reach a deal before the fiscal cliff deadline. the whitehouse open sists tax rates must rise on higher incomes in order to balance spending cuts but republican leadership remains committed to extending the bush tax cuts for all a tax bracket. brainer offer his response to the president. in an interview with julianna goldman of bloomberg news obama called the boehner plan quote out of balance. >> i think that we have the potential of getting a deal done, but it's going to require what i talked about during the campaign which is a balanced responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses certainty and make sure that the country grows. and unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks for example about $800 billion worth of revenues but he says he's going to do that by lowering rates. when you look at the math, it doesn't work. >> ro
. we've been a good investor for a long time. we've taken a lot of heat here in new york city and washington, d.c. because we've stood tall as good, honest partner with the chinese. but what's also incumbent on you is when you've earned that position occasionally you have to speak up. and i did. >> rose: as you know, when you speak up about china people also say "look at general electric, this great american company. they're exporting jobs as well." >> we have jobs all over the world, right? so we are the second-biggest exporter behind boeing. we're a net exporter in every other country in the world. but we will sell more gas turbines -- we have a 50% market share of the large gas turbine market. we will sell more in algeria in the next three years than the united states. so what are we supposed to do? are we supposed to sit here and just say, oh, it's too hard? >> rose: and if you don't get the business somebody else will. >> somebody else is going to get it. we're down to the point after 130 years that basically we're the only american company left and most of the businesses
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)